June 7: The Pioneers of the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil 1890

Welcome to the Holy Women, Holy Men blog! We invite you to read about this commemoration, use the collect and lessons in prayer, whether individually or in corporate worship, then tell us what you think. For more information about this project, click here.

###

About this commemoration:

The presence of Anglicans in Brazil is first recorded in the early
nineteenth century and took the form of chaplaincies for English
expatriates. It was not, however, until 1890 when missionary efforts
among the Brazilian people began under the care of two Episcopal
Church missionaries, Lucien Lee Kinsolving and James Watson
Morris. They held the first service on Trinity Sunday 1890 in Porto
Alegre. Within a year, three additional missionaries—William Cabell
Brown, John Gaw Meem, and Mary Packard—arrived and joined
the work. These five missionaries are the pioneers and considered the
founders of the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil.
In 1899, Kinsolving was made missionary bishop for the work in
Brazil by the House of Bishops of the Episcopal Church, and in 1907
the missionary district of Brazil was established by The General
Convention. The number of parishes and institutions continued to
increase. The bishops were raised up from among Episcopal Church
missionaries who were serving in the missionary district. Fifty years
after the work first began, in 1940, the first native Brazilian was
elected to the episcopate, Athalício Theodoro Pithan.
By 1950, the work had increased to the point that the missionary
district was too large and it was divided into three dioceses. This set
the stage for the continued development of the church in Brazil, which
eventually led to the formation of the Episcopal Anglican Church of
Brazil as an autonomous Province of the Anglican Communion in
1965. Complete financial independence from the Episcopal Church
was completed by 1982, although the two churches continue to
have strong bonds of affection and united mission efforts through
companion diocese relationships and coordination at the church-wide
level.

Collects

I  O God, who didst send thy Son to preach peace to those
who are far off and to those who are near: we bless thee
for the missionaries from the Episcopal Church and those
who first responded to their message, joining together to
establish the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil; and we
pray that we, like them, may be ready to preach Christ
crucified and risen, and to encourage and support those
who pioneer new missions in him; who liveth and reigneth
with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.
Amen.

II O God, who sent your Son to preach peace to those who
are far off and to those who are near: we bless you for
the missionaries from the Episcopal Church and those
who first responded to their message, joining together to
establish the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil; and we
pray that we, like them, may be ready to preach Christ
crucified and risen, and to encourage and support those
who pioneer new missions in him; who lives and reigns
with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.
Amen.

Psalm 125

Lessons
2 Esdras 2:42–48
1 Peter 1:18–25
Luke 4:14–21

Preface of All Saints

From Holy, Women, Holy Men: Celebrating the Saints © 2010 by The Church Pension Fund. Used by permission.

###

We invite your reflections about this commemoration and its suitability for the official calendar and worship of The Episcopal Church. How did this person’s life witness to the Gospel? How does this person inspire us in Christian life today?

To post a comment, your first and last name and email address are required. Your name will be published; your email address will not. The first time you post, a moderator will need to approve your submission; after that, your comments will appear instantly.

About Ruth Meyers
Hodges-Haynes Professor of Liturgics, Church Divinity School of the Pacific; Chair, Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music

4 Responses to June 7: The Pioneers of the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil 1890

  1. Dan Joslyn-Siemiatkoski says:

    2 Esdras is an interesting choice in that this is not canonically recognized within the Jewish tradition and does not appear in the Tanakh. Granted that the Anglican tradition utilizes the Apocrypha, how does this selection represent an inclusion of OT / Hebrew Scriptures? Or are we talking about including pre-Christian writings that may or may not always be recognized as canonical within a Jewish tradition?

  2. Nigel Renton says:

    When it is known, I would like to see the year of birth of those we honor in HWHM. I understand why prominence is given to the year in which they entered the Church Triumphant, but I would find it even better if the year of birth were also shown in the biographical material.

    A case in point is that of Isabelle Hapgood, whom we remembered on June 26.

    Nigel Renton

  3. John Robison says:

    Dan Joslyn-Siemiatkoski –

    I would say that it represents the Christian Old Testament, as found in the Septuagint, more than it dose the Hebrew Bible.

  4. Sam Portaro says:

    Is “Pioneers” the best descriptor for this group? Were they not properly “Missionaries” or “Missioners?”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: